Tag Archive for USPTO

Fintiv: More Work, Less Quality

When the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB or “Board”) first decided the IPR that led to the Fintiv rule, it justified its decision on the basis of “balanc[ing] considerations such as system efficiency, fairness, and patent quality.” But that rationale doesn’t hold up to the facts.

Guest Post: A Solution to the OpenSky Problem

Joe Matal is a former Acting Director and Acting Solicitor of the USPTO and a current partner at Haynes and Boone, where he specializes in PTAB trials and Federal Circuit appeals. I have written several times about the $2.2 billion verdict in the VLSI v. Intel case.  The case is extraordinary not just because of…

Moving The USPTO From Red To Black

IBM is famous for obtaining a lot of patents.  Year after year, they’re the top recipient of U.S. patents (or, once in a while, in second place when you account for related entities.) But they’re also infamous among patent practitioners for abandoning a lot of patents after they issue.  Like, a lot of patents.  IBM…

Comments on USPTO’s Newest Regulation Overall Oppose Discretionary Denial Rules

The USPTO is considering whether to enshrine discretionary denial of inter partes review cases into regulation.  Last week, comments were due on the most recent portion of this process.  (CCIA’s comments criticizing the current General Plastic, Valve, NHK Spring, and Fintiv precedential opinions, and explaining why they should not be converted into rules, can be…

Changes Reducing IPR Institution Rate Have Increased Litigation Frequency and Cost

graph showing close correlation between cost of NPE litigation and increases in procedural denials of IPR

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office’s precedential opinions on discretionary denial are the subject of significant attention—a withdrawn attempt by the Trump Administration to codify discretionary denial as a rule, a request for comments on rulemaking by the Office, and a challenge to the practice of discretionary denial as illegal under the Administrative Procedure Act.…

Covered Business Method Review and Thryv

On Monday, the Supreme Court granted, vacated, and remanded (GVRed) the Federal Circuit’s decision in Emerson Electric v. SIPCO in light of this year’s Thryv decision.  Emerson was challenging the Federal Circuit’s overturning of the USPTO’s determination that the SIPCO patent was eligible for review under the covered business method (CBM) program. With the Court’s…

Meet the Western District of Texas—NPEs Certainly Have

For years, the Eastern District of Texas was the favored stomping ground for patent trolls.  Short times from filing to trial, shorter trials, judges with local rules friendly to patent plaintiffs, and a jury pool that tended to be friendly to plaintiffs all contributed to this.  It probably didn’t hurt that Eastern District judges were…

PTO Patent Licensing Marketplace Shows Potential, But Will Licensors Embrace It?

This month, the PTO announced that it would be opening up an online licensing market, “Patents 4 Partnerships.”  The market, which will initially focus on COVID-related patents, is intended to provide a centralized and easily accessible database of U.S. patents and published patent applications that have been voluntarily made available for licensing. There’s a number…