Tag Archive for inter partes review

PTAB Rejects Allergan’s Tribal Sovereign Immunity Claim

On Friday, the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) issued a ruling rejecting Allergan’s sovereign immunity claims. As Patent Progress has previously described [1][2][3], Allergan sold their patents to a Native American tribe, licensed them back, and required the tribe to claim sovereign immunity against inter partes reviews.  But, as also previously described here, there…

Innovation Is Alive And Well—Patenting Activity

After examining the evidence for U.S. innovation as shown by startups and venture capital, and by R&D spending, I want to look at patenting activity—new patent applications and new patent grants.  Particularly given accusations that the U.S. patent system has fallen behind other systems worldwide—accusations based on extremely questionable analysis—it’s worth looking at what patent…

Dear Director Iancu

So, you’re Andrei Iancu, about to be the newly confirmed Director of the United States Patent and Trademark Office.  What are the first things you put on your agenda? I have some suggestions. Eliminate Contingent Amendments As an initial matter, the PTAB’s practice of allowing contingent amendments needs to end.  Essentially, this allows patent owners…

Starting Off 2018 With More Sovereign Immunity

2018 started off with a sovereign immunity bang, with the Saint Regis Mohawk Tribe filing a motion that implicitly suggests that the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) would only rule against them due to financial self-interest and political pressure. (For more background on the Allergan/Saint Regis Mohawk IPRs, you can read my earlier posts…

You Don’t Need To Build An IPR Off-Ramp—It Already Exists

At the House Judiciary Committee’s IP Subcommittee hearing on sovereign immunity, Chairman Issa had a simple request for Phil Johnson, one of the witnesses—to, for the record, “look at the various off-ramp possibilities” for PTAB proceedings.  An off-ramp is a way for a patent owner to take their patent and amend it in front of…

A Big Day For The PTO—And A Good Day

On Monday, the Supreme Court heard arguments in two separate cases regarding inter partes review (IPR)—Oil States v. Greene’s Energy and SAS Institute v. Matal.  In both Oil States and SAS, the Court appears to be sympathetic to the Patent Office’s arguments—and that’s good for everyone. Oil States The Oil States case focuses on whether…

Misleading Stats Lead To Misleading Testimony In Front Of Congress

Yesterday afternoon, the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held a hearing on “Sovereign Immunity and the Intellectual Property System.”  A fascinating topic, and one I’ve written on right here in the past.  [1] [2] But I was struck by some testimony given by Philip Johnson, testimony he stood by…

Tribal Immunity May Not Be Wonder Drug For Allergan

This article was originally published on Law360 and is reprinted here. You’ve probably already heard the story. Allergan PLC owns patents related to relieving dry eyes. These patents allegedly read on their drug Restasis. They expired in 2014, leading to a group of generic manufacturers getting ready to enter the market with generic versions of the drug. In…

Big Tech vs. Big Pharma: An Article Filled With Big Errors

On Monday, the Financial Times published an article by Rana Foroohar.  While there are a lot of flaws in the article, one particularly pernicious myth shows up—the myth that patent trolls aren’t really a problem.  Purporting to look at patent reform as a battle between the tech industry and pharmaceutical manufacturers, the FT article gives…