Tag Archive for studies

The ITC In 2020: Anything But Typical

With the American republic having just had its 245th birthday, let’s take a look at an agency that’s charged with regulating trade with foreign countries, encouraging American industries, and protecting American labor. I’ve previously criticized the International Trade Commission (ITC) for having gone from being a trade court protecting U.S. domestic industry to being a…

Discretionary Denials at the PTAB Continue to Rise, Benefit NPEs

According to new data from Unified Patents, the rise in discretionary denials at the PTAB is showing no signs of slowing down.  In 2019, there were 6 denials based on co-pending litigation (so-called § 314(a) or Fintiv denials).  In these denials, the PTAB decides not to institute an inter partes review based primarily on related…

New Study Shows That IPR Delivers An Economic Benefit, Even If The District Court Doesn’t Stay Litigation

New research from the Perryman Group shows that inter partes review (IPR) is economically beneficial, even if co-pending district court litigation isn’t stayed.  The Perryman study, commissioned by Unified Patents, examines IPR’s economic impact, including the difference between staying or continuing on with a co-pending district court case.  There are two important findings in this…

FTC Hearings #4: Patents, Intellectual Property, and Innovation

This post has been cross-posted to DisCo. Last week, the FTC held the fourth in its set of hearings focusing on “Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century.”  The first day focused on a review of the current landscape of intellectual property and competition.  The second day featured a variety of panels focusing on…

Yet More Evidence That NPEs Are Harmful To Innovation

Profs. Cohen, Gurun, and Kominers first published a paper collecting evidence of the impacts of NPEs on innovation in 2014.  Recently, they updated the paper, incorporating additional evidence and research from the past four years.  The key takeaways? “NPE litigation has a real negative impact on innovation at targeted firms: firms substantially reduce their innovative…

Further Evidence That Examiners Can Be Incentivized To Improve Patent Quality

Patent Progress has previously covered the research of Profs. Wasserman and Frakes regarding structural incentives at the USPTO that affect examiner behavior.  A new paper in the AIPLA Quarterly Journal, written by Eric Blatt and Lian Huang (both former examiners), examines another area in which examiner incentives affect behavior—the Signatory Authority Review Program.