Tag Archive for ipr

New Study Shows That IPR Delivers An Economic Benefit, Even If The District Court Doesn’t Stay Litigation

New research from the Perryman Group shows that inter partes review (IPR) is economically beneficial, even if co-pending district court litigation isn’t stayed.  The Perryman study, commissioned by Unified Patents, examines IPR’s economic impact, including the difference between staying or continuing on with a co-pending district court case.  There are two important findings in this…

Comments on USPTO’s Newest Regulation Overall Oppose Discretionary Denial Rules

The USPTO is considering whether to enshrine discretionary denial of inter partes review cases into regulation.  Last week, comments were due on the most recent portion of this process.  (CCIA’s comments criticizing the current General Plastic, Valve, NHK Spring, and Fintiv precedential opinions, and explaining why they should not be converted into rules, can be…

Cert Granted in Arthrex Case On PTAB Appointments

This week, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in a set of related cases between Arthrex and Smith & Nephew, as well as the federal government.  The cases revolve around one fundamental question: are judges of the Patent Trial and Appeal Board (PTAB) principal officers of the United States?  That question controls the constitutionality of their…

A Follow-up on CyWee and ZTE v. LG and the Public

A few weeks ago, I covered a PTAB case that illustrates why the PTO’s proposed rule on who bears the burden on amended claims in IPRs is fatally flawed.  In that case, ZTE challenged a CyWee patent and LG joined the ZTE petition.  But CyWee filed an amended claim that ZTE wasn’t concerned by. ZTE…

CyWee, ZTE, and the PTAB v. the Public Interest

In an order issued this week in IPR2019-00143, a panel of PTAB judges decided that the public has no interest in ensuring that only valid patent claims issue from the Patent Office. That’s not an exaggeration—if anything, it understates the case.  In fact, the PTAB order states that “the public is generally likely to benefit…