Tag Archive for Google

Iancu’s First Hearing Answers Questions, Leaves More Open

On Wednesday, April 18, new USPTO Director Andrei Iancu appeared for his first oversight hearing in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee.  The Director was more open with the Committee compared to his confirmation process, leading to some interesting discussions. Algorithms Are Already Patentable A number of questions focused on the issue of patentable subject…

ContentGuard: Arguendo

Today, we watched as a man stood in front of a panel and explained how the other side had behaved improperly and how the decisions they made were incorrect and contrary to applicable legal standards. I’m speaking, of course, of the ContentGuard oral arguments.  What did you think I was talking about? Oral Argument at the…

ContentGuard: Validity and Privilege

Monday I summarized the history of the ContentGuard cases, and yesterday I described the process of claim interpretation.  Today, we’ll turn to an issue that we’ve focused on recently, patent validity.  ContentGuard convinced the jury that the ContentGuard patents were valid—can they convince the Federal Circuit? Abstract Ideas We’ve written a lot about patents on…

ContentGuard: Defining A Patent Case

Yesterday, I went through the history of the ContentGuard v. Apple and ContentGuard v. Google cases.  I talked briefly about the Markman process; today, I’d like to go into more detail on what Markman is, how it works, how Markman affected the ContentGuard cases, and why it’s such an important issue in patent litigation in…

Previewing ContentGuard v. Apple and Google at the Federal Circuit

This Thursday, June 8, the Federal Circuit will hold oral argument in ContentGuard Holdings, Inc. v. Apple, Inc. and in ContentGuard Holdings, Inc. v Google, Inc.  (The Google case also includes a number of major Android phone manufacturers, such as Samsung, HTC, and Motorola.)  Both cases have roughly similar histories, and both appeals deal with…

Uniloc-ing Defendants Into The Eastern District of Texas

Yesterday, Uniloc sued Google in the Eastern District of Texas.  Uniloc is a Luxembourg based company, not a Texas company.1  Google?  Also not a Texas company.  So, if neither of the companies involved are Texan, why are we still in the Eastern District of Texas? History Uniloc filed a set of lawsuits against Google based…

Guest Post: Are Copyright and Patent Overlapping or Mutually Exclusive in Protecting Software Innovations?

Prof. Pamela Samuelson is the Richard M. Sherman Distinguished Professor of Law and Information at the University of California, Berkeley.  She is recognized as a pioneer in digital copyright law, intellectual property, cyberlaw and information policy.  We’re pleased to be able to republish this post, which first appeared on Patently-O. “Neither the Copyright Statute nor…

An Analysis of the Final FTC-Motorola Settlement

Today, the FTC released its Final Order in its settlement with Motorola on the company’s use of standard essential patents (SEPs).  Although there isn’t much “here” here, as the Commission is required by law to open Consent Decrees to public comment before it finalizes them, the 25 public comments (including one from my organization) the Commission received led to…

Mueller’s critique against Google off base

Last month, Florian Mueller authored a provocative blog post, criticizing Google for its recent pledge not to assert ten of its patents against any open source project. Mueller has never been a fan of these kinds of pledges, so his comments aren’t surprising. Mueller’s main criticism is that Google hasn’t gone far enough: compared to IBM, Sun,…