Joshua Landau

Joshua Landau is the Patent Counsel at the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA), where he represents and advises the association regarding patent issues.  Mr. Landau joined CCIA from WilmerHale in 2017, where he represented clients in patent litigation, counseling, and prosecution, including trials in both district courts and before the PTAB.

Prior to his time at WilmerHale, Mr. Landau was a Legal Fellow on Senator Al Franken’s Judiciary staff, focusing on privacy and technology issues.  Mr. Landau received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and his B.S.E.E. from the University of Michigan.  Before law school, he spent several years as an automotive engineer, during which time he co-invented technology leading to U.S. Patent No. 6,934,140.

Follow @PatentJosh on Twitter.

 

Posts by Josh Landau

Announcing the 2020 Patent Progress Writing Competition

We are pleased to announce the 2020 Patent Progress writing competition.   This competition, open to current law students, solicits scholarship regarding patent law.  This year’s general topic is new issues in patent law and policy related to the trend towards complex multi-component products.  Examples of such issues include apportionment of damages, the smallest saleable patent…

USPTO, DoJ, and NIST Issue FRAND/SEP Policy Statement

Last week, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, U.S. Department of Justice, and National Institute of Standards and Technology issued a joint statement on standard-essential patents (SEPs).  The statement clarifies the agencies’ position on an earlier 2013 statement made by USPTO and DoJ while completing the process of formally withdrawing from that statement. In essence,…

New Bill May Lead To Overly Aggressive Blocking Of Goods At Border

A new bill, introduced by Sens. Coons, Tillis, Hirono, and Cassidy, would give Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers the authority to seize goods at the border if they involve design patent violations.  Customs already has this authority for goods that violate copyrights or trademarks. But design patents work differently.  Trying to use the same…

Why Was Oracle v. Google in the Federal Circuit?

Last week, the Supreme Court granted certiorari in Google v. Oracle, preparing to review the Federal Circuit’s decision that application programming interfaces (APIs) are copyrightable and that the replication of an API to implement compatibility is not a fair use.  There are numerous legal flaws with the Federal Circuit’s decisions, flaws addressed at length in…

Supreme Court Hears Oral Argument in Copyright Sovereign Immunity Case

This post, from guest author Jonathan Band, first appeared on the Disruptive Competition Project.  While the case addresses sovereign immunity with respect to copyright claims, it directly implicates the Florida Prepaid decision which applied sovereign immunity to states who infringe patents.  Later cases interpreted Florida Prepaid to bar actions by defendants seeking to invalidate state…

Senate Hearing on Patent Quality Today

Later today, the Senate will hold a hearing on how Congress can help prevent the issuance of poor quality patents.  I recently testified at a hearing on the STRONGER Patents Act and patent quality was one of the topics discussed.  In fact, in my responses to questions for the record from Sen. Tillis, I addressed…

Voting Machines, Patents, and National Security

When standard-essential patents (SEPs) are in the news, it’s usually in the context of cellular or wireless networking standards.  Maybe you’ve thought about how standards govern other things, ranging from audio-visual encoding standards like MP3 to threads on fire hydrants. But what you probably don’t think about are voting machine standards.

New E.D. Texas Ruling Is Vicarious Victory for Trolls

In a decision issued last week, Judge Gilstrap—the “poster boy” for patent trolls’ favorite court, the Eastern District of Texas—has mangled the law on induced infringement, contributory infringement, and willfulness.  The ruling in Motiva v. Sony & HTC contradicts case law and the logic of the statute, cites case law for a proposition it explicitly…