Blackbird Grounded—For Now

Almost two years ago, I wrote about a new non-practicing entity (NPE)—Blackbird Technologies.  It claimed to be helping innovators, but the main innovation it helped promote was its own—having the lawyers own the patents on which Blackbird was suing.

When I first wrote about Blackbird, it had just sued Cloudflare over the ‘335 patent, which Blackbird had effectively interpreted as covering any system which modified electronic communications in transit.  Now, two years later, after a district court decision, an appeal, and plenty of legal fees, the courts have made clear that Blackbird’s patent never should have issued in the first place.  In particular, the district court held that Blackbird’s patent was directed to the abstract idea of monitoring a data stream and modifying it when a specific condition is identified and was thus invalid under 35 U.S.C. § 101.

That’s the right result, but if Cloudflare was sued today on the same patent, it’s not clear they’d have gotten to the same point—or at least, not as quickly as within two years.  Federal Circuit cases like Berkheimer have made it harder to fight these sorts of patents early in litigation by converting the legal determination of invalidity into a factual dispute.  And the Patent Office is pushing guidance on § 101 that could be misinterpreted by an examiner to allow more of this type of patent to issue in the first place.

These changes represent serious threats to the tools that have been developed to combat low-quality, invalid patents.  Those patents, as I wrote earlier this week, do more than threaten to take money out of the pockets of large companies.  They also threaten the existence of small companies—the exact companies who most need the kind of quick, inexpensive processes for fighting a patent that Berkheimer deters.

Joshua Landau

Joshua Landau is the Patent Counsel at the Computer & Communications Industry Association (CCIA), where he represents and advises the association regarding patent issues.  Mr. Landau joined CCIA from WilmerHale in 2017, where he represented clients in patent litigation, counseling, and prosecution, including trials in both district courts and before the PTAB.

Prior to his time at WilmerHale, Mr. Landau was a Legal Fellow on Senator Al Franken’s Judiciary staff, focusing on privacy and technology issues.  Mr. Landau received his J.D. from Georgetown University Law Center and his B.S.E.E. from the University of Michigan.  Before law school, he spent several years as an automotive engineer, during which time he co-invented technology leading to U.S. Patent No. 6,934,140.

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